Tag Archives: kids

How to change the way your child thinks about school.

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Image from Relatably.com

Changing the way your child thinks about school is already a daunting task, so don’t expect miracles or overnight success.

It is school after all.

This isn’t a checklist or advice that works on cue. These are segments of living that should be worked into conversations and issues and built upon as you move throughout the school year.

Because I’ve spent the last week preparing my classroom for the school year, I’ve been thinking not just about curriculum but about the little human beings who will walk through the door come Monday. If you’ve been reading my posts, then you know I have a gift. And, like all gifts or anything powerful for that matter, there are good and bad sides to it.

The gift I’m talking about is the ability to see things from a teacher’s point of view and a parent’s point of view. You see why I say it has a good and bad side?

So, when I tell you how to change the way your child thinks about school, I’m considering both the teacher’s and the parent’s perspectives in a very realistic, practical view.

Now, when you read through the following points, the emphasis is on SHOW and Tell not just tell.

Show and tell your child that he or she is smart.

Don’t say this in a condescending way, you know, with that high pitched voice that makes your child feel even more uncomfortable with what you’re about to say. I just got into a fight with one of my own about intelligence. I more often than not do the same with my students.

Parent: “You are so smart and you know this.”

Child: No I’m not. So many kids are smarter than I am.

Parent: What are you talking about? Since when have you used that excuse?

Child: Excuse for what?

Parent: For not believing in yourself….

Child: (Rolls eyes.) God, give me a break. YOU only think I’m smart.

Parent: (Rolls eyes.) Give ME a break. I tell you when I think you’re doing something stupid don’t I? I’m talking about what I see, really. I see you create incredible work. I hear you answer questions with such unique answers, I sometimes wonder if you’re part alien. And, if I’m stuck on a problem, I know that if I talk to you that you’ll help me turn it into a solution.

Child: (Half-smiles as the conversation continues.)

Kids are smarter than ever, contrary to what popular statistics often emphasize. I remember asking my six-year-old nephew how to find several different things on my cell phone. He was quicker and more pleasant to talk to than any IT guy I’ve tried to communicate with.

Show and tell your child you’ll help him or her through difficulties.

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Whether in elementary, middle, or high school, your child needs to know that you’re there to help no matter what, that you’ll help them through anything especially if they ask you.

Parent: How was your day?

Child: Mm, long.

Parent: Funniest thing that happened?

Child: Nothing.

Parent: Listen, even if you don’t want to talk right now, I’m here for you, okay kid? You hear me?

Child: Yeah, thanks.

Kids, especially teenagers, might not want to talk right away, but they do need to know that you’re available. You need to make it clear sometimes, especially when you can tell they haven’t had such a good day.

Show it by going out of your way to pick them up and ask questions about their day. Play a game with them. Ask them questions. Pay attention to them.

Show your child that you listen.

Sometimes, every once in awhile, parents just don’t want to listen. I get it. But, listening to your child express his or her anger, grief, drudgery in life, and happiness, among other things, gives him or her a chance to not only vent but to realize that age-old line, “I’m here for you kid.”

In other words, you need to prove that you really are there for him or her on a daily basis, no matter how tired or stressed you are.

The chatter can be endless, but those of you with moody teenagers know that when the chatter starts, you listen.

If you can’t get them to talk, take them to a restaurant or do something with them that they really like to do. In the process, you might hear something like the following.

Child: I had the longest most irritating day. You know that girl I told you about? Mean girls, you know. She tore me down little by little and had everyone ignore me all day. Can you believe what followers they are? Really! What a bunch of losers. I feel like….

Parent listens. Child texts.

Child: Oh my God, Kathy just texted me that she hates her. Ha! I can’t believe she hates her.

Parent says nothing for now.

Child: Thanks for taking me to get those shoes I wanted.

Parent: You’re very welcome.

Your own excursion might take longer and the chatter may not make much sense, but the time that your child spends with you does matter. He or she will remember it even if you think it didn’t make a difference.

Show and tell stories to make a point.

Please please please don’t start it with, “When I was a kid….”

Do start with something like, “This kid with super straight blond hair used to point and laugh at me all the time. I really hated that kid. I ignored him all the time but he never stopped pointing and laughing at me. I don’t know what I did to him but apparently I was really funny to him. Then halfway into the school year he fell on his face in front of everyone. I saw the whole thing happen. He tripped over nothing. Everyone laughed at him and I actually felt bad for him as a little girl tried to help him get up.”

There are so many opportunities to insert really great stories into the simplest conversations. Yes, I know, most of us don’t want to even think about our school days, but when you have children, that’s all you do if you care even just a little bit about helping them get through some of the tougher obstacles in life.

Depending on the grade level, you can think of many times when you had to overcome similar difficulties.

Ultimately, be real with your children.

No, please don’t always tell them the truth. Sometimes, the truth is just depressing, but be real. After you’ve been listening to them, you know how to be realistic while still motivating them.

Child: God, I hate school.

Parent: Why, what happened?

Child: The stupid teacher yelled at me then made fun of me in front of the whole class.

Parent: Which class?

Child: Math

Parent: What’d she do?

Child: She freakin’ saw me talking to this kid, but I was just telling the kid to leave me alone ‘cause he wouldn’t stop asking me how to do problems. She just assumed it was my fault. God, I hate her.

Parent: Did you talk to her?

Child: NO! Really?! God!

Parent: That stinks. I’m so sorry that happened. I’ll talk to the teacher for you.

Child: NO! I’ll do it.

Parent: Okay, okay, I understand. You can also ask to be moved.

Child: True.

Parent: I know teachers can be unfair but if you give them a chance…you know, kinda like when you give me a chance, like when I just assume the fights with your brother are your fault…

Now, you’ve got the attention of your child. You give them something realistic to latch onto and there’s a willingness to listen and change where there wasn’t that before.

Successful communication between parents and children changes daily and by the minute. Sometimes the best communication means not saying one word, not even giving them a hug, but allowing them to be alone and telling them when they’re ready to talk you’ll be there for them.

 

 

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